Fitness Matters

Want to lose weight? Monitor your heart rate? Count the number of your steps you walk? Your smartphone helps you do all of these things. With various apps and advances, smartphones remove the guesswork and create fitness tools to help you take your health seriously. Over half of adult smartphone owners use them for medical and health information, according to Who Is Hosting This, which shows that tracking fitness is more than a trend. Now are you curious about what features will put the zing.
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These five power foods are extra important for women. Try and add these to you meals to help you feel great

Edamame

Why to try: Vegetarians praise edamame as a high-protein snack, but each little pod is also a nutritional superstar for keeping our heart health in check. Research suggests that edamame’s soy protein content and its antioxidant is oflavone compounds may reduce total and bad cholesterol levels. Edamame also contains heart-healthy omega-3s and 30 percent of your recommended daily dose of cholesterol-lowering fibre in one cup, helping.
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We can all agree that the worst part about working out at the gym is the gym. The music is too loud. It’s always too hot or too cold. And your favorite machine is always occupied by the same super-fit guy who is way better at using it than you. You spend most of your time in the gym staring out the window at the park across the street. If only there was a way to replicate the effectiveness of a complete gym workout without.
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A strong, toned lower half not only turns heads, but it also boosts your performance in nearly every activity, from running errands to running marathons. This four-move plyometrics workout for your legs and butt is designed to be done anywhere and doesn’t require any equipment. But wait. What’s plyometrics again? Plyometrics is a style of exercise based on the idea that explosive movements performed in short intervals of time can add up to big gains in terms of speed and.
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A walk in the park may soothe the mind and, in the process, change the workings of our brains in ways that improve our mental health, according to an interesting new study of the physical effects on the brain of visiting nature.

Most of us today live in cities and spend far less time outside in green, natural spaces than people did several generations ago.

City dwellers also have a higher risk for anxiety, depression and other mental illnesses than people living outside urban.

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